Select a destination: Hobart For Everyone | Hobart Visitors Guide | Advertise With Us

slideshow

Explore Hobart: Suburban

Hobart, the capital and major seaport of Tasmania, lies on the estuary of the Derwent River, with Mount Wellington dominating the skyline in spectacular glory. Founded in 1803 as a British penal colony, it is one of Australia's oldest cities and serves as the home port for both Australian and French Antarctic operations. A city of contrasts, there is much to see and do. Bush walkers and photographers are rewarded by the views from the summit of Hobart's famous backdrop, whilst Battery Point is a 'slice of history' with unspoiled examples of Victorian and Georgian buildings.

Suburban Attractions

Mt Wellington

Hobart is defined by Mt. Wellington. Rising 1270 metres above Hobart's harbour and the wide Derwent River, it forms a stunning backdrop to the city while the spectacular vista from the top encompassing the surrounding islands and estuaries is truly world class. The summit may be a short drive from the city centre but is a world removed, a true mountain environment complete with unpredictable weather, stunted sub-alpine flora, and a complex of buttresses, outcrops, screes and gullies.

Museum of Old and New Art

One of Hobart's premier attractions, Hobart's Museum of Old and New Art houses an exquisite collection of antiquities. Located among vineyards on a private peninsula on the Derwent River, pieces from Africa, pre-Columbian Costa Rica (including some gold), Egypt and the Roman colonies are on display in a series of light-filled galleries. Guided tours are available each day at 11 am and 2 pm. Free admission. Contact: (03) 6277 9900. Website. 655 Main Road, Berriedale.

Cycle Hobart

Tasmania is one of Australia's most popular bicycle touring destinations and it's easy to understand why. Not only is Tassie scenically endowed with glorious rolling hills and coastal views, but its roads are generally quiet. There are lots of places around Hobart that are easy to visit on two wheels - whether you prefer an easy riverside ride, or seek a more challenging ride like Mt Wellington, Hobart has a ride for everyone and AvantiPlus Hobart will help you on your way.

Battery Point

Retaining the character of a Cornish fishing village of the last century, the inner Hobart suburb of Battery Point began life as a home for mariners who worked out of Hobart Town. It is still mainly a residential area, with many historic homes and shops, some which are open for inspection as folk museums and art galleries.

Tasmanian Transport Museum

Tasmanian Transport Museum at Glenorchy is home to a vasy array of historical items and memorabilia relating to Tasmania's transport history. The museum exhibits include railway locomotives, railmotors, carriages and wagons, trams, trolley buses, motor buses, stationary steam engines and many other items of historical interest. Diesel hauled train trips are run at the museum twice a month, on the first and third Sunday. Entry fees apply.

Colonial Fortifications

Retaining the character of a Cornish fishing village of the last century, the inner Hobart suburb of Battery Point began life as a home for mariners who worked out of Hobart Town. It is still mainly a residential area, with many historic homes and shops, some which are open for inspection as folk museums and art galleries.

Alum Cliffs

The Alum Cliffs walkway also offers some eminently photographic views. At the end of the walkway is the Blackmans Bay blowhole. The scenic delights of the area can be enjoyed from the walkway, or on the coastal drive through Blackmans Bay, Tinderbox and Howden or the views of Droughty Point, Bruny Island and D Entrecasteaux Channel from Piersons Point.

Derwent Valley Wine Region

The Derwent Valley vineyards are clustered around Berriedale and Granton on the west bank of the Derwent River as it flows towards Hobart and the sea. The region produces about seven percent of Tasmania's wine, including some of the state's Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, sparkling wines and Merlot.

South Arm Peninsula

South Arm Peninsula is one of Hobart's forgotten places. Forming the eastern bank of the lower Derwent Estuary, this U-shaped peninsula is the perfect desination for an unhurried day out. The terrain is relatively flat so walking is easy for anyone with an average level of fitness, and the rows of social fishing boats on the shoreline of Opossum Bay are telltale signs that this is good fishing territory.

This website is part of the Australia For Everyone network of travel and information websites.
Email Ph: 0412 879 698. Content © 2017, Australia For Everyone