Sandy Bay


Sandy Bay is a suburb of the city of Hobart, located immediately south of the central business district, and adjoins the suburb of Battery Point, and has a long frontage to the River Derwent.

Sandy Bay has many large homes, and is known as one of the city s prestigious areas. In the more southern areas of Sandy Bay, close to the water and also high on the slopes of Mt Nelson, are some of Tasmania s most expensive real estate. It is also the site of the Hobart campus of the University of Tasmania, and the private schools, Fahan School, The Hutchins School, and Mount Carmel College, Sandy Bay. There is considerable diversity within the suburb. The area surrounding the University of Tasmania is home to considerable student accommodation.



Sandy Bay is accessible from the city via Sandy Bay Road, which runs from Davey Street in the city all the way to the Kingborough municipal boundary at Taroona where it becomes the Channel Highway. Before the construction of the Southern Outlet, the road was the primary route to and from Kingston. The higher parts of Sandy Bay are accessible via Regent Street, which bypasses the main shopping district and goes through the University to Churchill Avenue and Lower Sandy Bay.


Blinking Point, Sandy Bay

Sandy Bay is bounded on the east by the Derwent River, and has several beaches along the shore, the main beaches with public access are Nutgrove Beach and Long Beach. Australia s first legal casino, Wrest Point Hotel Casino, was opened in 1973 at the site of the former Wrest Point Riviera hotel.

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Alexandra Battery



The Alexandra Battery is a colonial era fort built on the banks of the Derwent Estuary at Geography Bay near Sandy Bay. The presence of the Russian warships in the Derwent River, and the condemning of the Battery Point batteries in 1878 had expedited the development of the Alexandra and Kangaroo Batteries, which were built on opposite sides of the estuary. Construction began on the new fortifications in 1880, and at the same time, a new permanent field artillery unit, the Southern Tasmanian Volunteer Artillery equipped with two breech-loading 12 pound howitzers and two 32 pounder guns on field carriages, was raised.



Following the dismantling of the Battery Point batteries, much of the stonework was relocated to the site of the Alexandra Battery. The site of the Alexandra Battery is now a public park with commanding views of the river, and much of the original construction is still accessible.






Wrest Point Hotel Casino



Australia's first legal casino was the 17-storey Wrest Point Hotel Casino in Sandy Bay, opened in 1973. It is still the tallest building in the city, despite being several kilometres out of the CBD, and a nationally recognised icon. The Wrest Point Riviera Hotel, Designed by Architect Keith Wildman and built by Arthur Drysdale and opened in 5 December 1939, was originally constructed on the site of the current Wrest Point Casino.

After the centre's opening in 1973 (after which it was known as Wrest Point Hotel Casino) the casino provided a catalyst for the nation's casino industry, with 12 additional casinos opening across the country. This included a second Federal Group casino in Tasmania, the Country Club Casino, which opened in Launceston in 1982. The building has been extended in recent years, including the conference centre which was opened in 1984, and the boardwalk in 1996. It remains Hobart's only casino and is home to Hobart's only revolving restaurant, situated seventeen floors above the River Derwent.


Mount Nelson



Though not as well known or frequented as often as its higher and more famous neighbour, Mt. Wellington, Mt. Nelson is the perfect place to get an alternate bird's eye of Hobart and surrounds, particularly on the days when Mt. Wellington is shrouded and mist or snow, which is quite often. This lookout provides a dramatic panorama of the city even on days with relatively poor visibility. During the day a visitor can experience the beauty of the city, river and harbour and at night the city is studded with twinkling lights. Lunch or teas can be taken at the restaurant. Contact: (03) 6230 8233. Location: Nelson Road, Mt. Nelson. How to get there: by car, travel south out of Hobart via Davey St and the Southern Outlet, take the Mt. Nelson exit at Tolmans Hill along Olinda Grove and on to the lookout at the end of Nelson Rd.

Mount Nelson was originally named 'Nelson's Hill' by Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny on the Bounty fame) in 1792 in honour of David Nelson, the botanist of the Bounty mission, as "he was the first white man on it" when the Bounty visited 'Van Diemens Land' on its way to Tahiti. Nelson was one of the Bounty crew who was loyal to Bligh during the mutiny. He died in Timor on 20 July 1789 of an 'inflammatory fever' caused by the long open-boat voyage following the mutiny. His funeral was attended by the Governor and officers from every ship in the harbour. The name 'Nelson's Hill' was later changed to Mount Nelson.

Most of the modern suburban development in Mount Nelson has taken place after 1945 when the government encouraged settlement of immigrants escaping the destruction that took place in Europe after World War II. During this same period the section of hillface north of the bends on Nelson Road, which used to be a firing range, was converted into university farm land for the University of Tasmania.

The main road in Mount Nelson is Nelson Road, which extends up the mountain from the Wrest Point Hotel Casino in the suburb of Sandy Bay. It is famously known for its "bends", which consist of seven very sharp corners created as the road winds its way up the mountain. All seven of the bends have been given a name. Nelson Road is one of the oldest thoroughfares in Hobart, being laid as the path to the signal station not long after the settlement of Hobart.

Linking the River Derwent and the summit of Mt Nelson is a thread of green woodland and native bush. Lower down, along the banks of Lambert Rivulet, Lambert Park protects remnant wet forest vegetation that is home to a range of birds, plants and animals. Higher up, the tracks run into the dry, open woodland of Bicentennial Park on the skyline ridge of Mt Nelson.






Sandy Bay's Beaches



Beaches in the Hobart municipal area around the suburb of Sandy Bay include Nutgrove Beach; Long Beach; Lords Beach; Red Chapel Beach, Sandy Bay; Short Beach and Cornelian Bay Beach, Cornelian Bay. Long Beach is very popular for picnics, BBQs, boating, sailing and sailboarding.

Sandy Bay History

The Queenborough Road Trust was initiated in 1861. The Trust was created under the Cross and Bye Roads Act 1852 (15 Vict No.8.), proposed on the 24 Nov 1860, and held its first meeting on 22 Jan 1861. Its purpose was to construct, maintain and regulate cross and bye roads in the Queenborough Road District.

The Browns River Road District was proclaimed on 8 Nov 1852, under the Cross and Bye Roads Act 1852 (15 Vict No.8.) and abolished on 4 Sep 1871. The Browns River and Sandy Bay Rivulet Road District was proclaimed on 4 Sep 1871, under the Cross and Bye Roads Act 1870 (33 Vict No.8.) and abolished on 26 Sep 1881.

The Browns River Road District was proclaimed on 26 Sep 1881, under the Cross and Bye Roads Act 1870 (33 Vict No.8.) and was abolished on 16 Nov 1885. The Sandy Bay Road District was proclaimed on 16 Nov 1885, under the Roads Act 1870 (48 Vict No.28.). The Browns River Road District proclaimed on 23 Jul 1897, and the name changed to Kingston on 26 Nov 1897.

Queenborough became a town under the Towns Act 1891 (55 Vict No.41.), and was proclaimed on 16 May 1892 (HTG 17 May 1892 p. 1038). It ultimately became part of the City of Hobart in 1914. Sandy Bay Post Office opened on 22 April 1852. It was named Queenborough between 1859 and 1878. In the south of the suburb a Lower Sandy Bay office opened in 1885. It was renamed Sandy Bay Lower in 1895, Beachside in 1921 and Sandy Bay Lower in 1968








How to get there:
Sandy Bay is accessible from the city via Sandy Bay Road, which runs from Davey Street in the city all the way to the Kingborough municipal boundary at Taroona where it becomes the Channel Highway. Before the construction of the Southern Outlet, the road was the primary route to and from Kingston. The higher parts of Sandy Bay are accessible via Regent Street, which bypasses the main shopping district and goes through the University to Churchill Avenue and Lower Sandy Bay.

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